'Don't Get Mad, Get Even,' Suggests Barb Goffman - Joanna Campbell Slan

'Don't Get Mad, Get Even,' Suggests Barb Goffman



An Interview with Barb Goffman, author of Don’t Get Mad, Get Even

 
When
I think “short stories,” the name that comes to mind most often is “Barb
Goffman.” Barb has been nominated for the Agatha Award five times, and the
Anthony and Macavity awards twice each.
Recently,
she agreed to answer some of my questions about her work.
1     Barb, how did you get started writing short stories?
It was early 2004. I’d been working on a novel,
and I saw a call for stories for Chesapeake
Crimes II
from my local chapter of Sisters in Crime. I’d never written a
mystery short story before

• Posted in Blog • |  19 Comments

19 replies on “'Don't Get Mad, Get Even,' Suggests Barb Goffman”

  1. Thanks for giving me the opportunity, Joanna. It can be helpful for me, as well, to think about these things.

    And thank you, Melodie. It's so much better to follow a road map – when driving or writing – to ensure you get to your destination using the most-efficient route.

  2. Barb,
    A truly wonderful post. I haven't written a short story in a long time. You've given me fruit for thought, along with lots of good advice.
    I'm sorry your ring was stolen at a mystery conference, of all places.

  3. An excellent post–very inspiring for an aspiring writer. One question–how does one find a helpful critique group? I don't know of any other aspiring writers in my location, though I'm sure there are.

    Suzanne

  4. Suzanne, Romance Writers of America has a lot of critique groups going all the time. Also, check with your local library. Sometimes people post a message asking for critique partners. Of course, many people who write crime fiction find compatible partners at MWA (Mystery Writers of America) or SinC (Sisters in Crime) meetings by asking around. I found my first critique group when I took a night class in writing. One of those sister students, Terri Kaminski, and I are friends to this day. We're both published authors now, which underscores how helpful the process can be.

  5. Great post, Barb and Joanna. I loved Barb's book. I just finished my very first short story for an anthology, and wish I had read this post before I started writing. Good thing I haven't sent off the edited version yet. Best of luck with your business, Barb. I'm sure you'll be successful.

  6. Hi, Marilyn. I hope my suggestions are helpful to you. And oh, I was so upset when that ring was stolen, but I got my first published story out of it, so I guess it's evened out. Sort of. 🙂

    Suzanne, thank you. Joanna's tips are good ones. What kind of fiction do you write? If it's crime, I strongly suggest joining Sisters in Crime. There may be a chapter near you. And if there's not, there's an online group for new writers called the Guppies. You could definitely find a critique group there. Good luck!

    And thank you, Polly, about the tips and my new business. I can't wait to read your story.

Comments are closed.

19 replies on “'Don't Get Mad, Get Even,' Suggests Barb Goffman”

  1. Thanks for giving me the opportunity, Joanna. It can be helpful for me, as well, to think about these things.

    And thank you, Melodie. It's so much better to follow a road map – when driving or writing – to ensure you get to your destination using the most-efficient route.

  2. Barb,
    A truly wonderful post. I haven't written a short story in a long time. You've given me fruit for thought, along with lots of good advice.
    I'm sorry your ring was stolen at a mystery conference, of all places.

  3. An excellent post–very inspiring for an aspiring writer. One question–how does one find a helpful critique group? I don't know of any other aspiring writers in my location, though I'm sure there are.

    Suzanne

  4. Suzanne, Romance Writers of America has a lot of critique groups going all the time. Also, check with your local library. Sometimes people post a message asking for critique partners. Of course, many people who write crime fiction find compatible partners at MWA (Mystery Writers of America) or SinC (Sisters in Crime) meetings by asking around. I found my first critique group when I took a night class in writing. One of those sister students, Terri Kaminski, and I are friends to this day. We're both published authors now, which underscores how helpful the process can be.

  5. Great post, Barb and Joanna. I loved Barb's book. I just finished my very first short story for an anthology, and wish I had read this post before I started writing. Good thing I haven't sent off the edited version yet. Best of luck with your business, Barb. I'm sure you'll be successful.

  6. Hi, Marilyn. I hope my suggestions are helpful to you. And oh, I was so upset when that ring was stolen, but I got my first published story out of it, so I guess it's evened out. Sort of. 🙂

    Suzanne, thank you. Joanna's tips are good ones. What kind of fiction do you write? If it's crime, I strongly suggest joining Sisters in Crime. There may be a chapter near you. And if there's not, there's an online group for new writers called the Guppies. You could definitely find a critique group there. Good luck!

    And thank you, Polly, about the tips and my new business. I can't wait to read your story.

Comments are closed.